Kansas WW1

Commemorating the First World War Centennial in Kansas

Taps at Pershing Park

Beginning on Memorial Day, every evening until Veteran’s Day “Taps” will be played at the flagpole by a lone bugler. You can read more about this by clicking here.

It is envisioned that this could become a regular, even permanent occurrence, sort of like the playing of the Last Post at the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, a Commonwealth War Graves Commission site in Ypres, Belgium. You can read about the Last Post ceremony by clicking here. ...read more

WW1-era US Submarine wreck found

Searchers say that they have located the wreck of the R-Class submarine R-8, later designated SS-85, which was intentionally sunk in 1936 during naval exercises off of the Delmarva Peninsula. In all, twenty-seven R-Class boats were built under non-cancellable contracts issued in April, 1917. Thirteen R-Class boats were launched prior to the Armistice but none were commissioned in time to see war service. The R-8 itself was commissioned on July 21st, 1919. You can read more about this by clicking here. ...read more

Cecilia Otto’s The Songs of WW1

Cecilia “Cece” Otto is a classically-trained singer and composer originally from Minnesota. In 2013 she started An American Songline, in her words “an ongoing project dedicated to preserving and sharing the story of America through unique, experiential musical performances”. The website says “these performances entertain, educate and delight thanks to Cece’s unique ability to engage modern audiences with the songs and stories of a simpler time.” ...read more

Norway in WW1

Norway was a brand-new country in 1914 – it had been only nine years since the nation was spun off from Sweden. Small in population and economically insignificant, Norway sat on the sidelines while the great powers of the day went to total war. How easy was it for Norway to remain neutral? Andrew McKay has this to say: ...read more

The Jihad Legacy of WW1

Most of us have become familiar with the concept of a Jihad. On November 14th, 1914, the influential religious leader of the Ottoman Caliphate known as the Sheikh-ul-Islam, declared a Jihad, urging all Muslims to rise up and defend the Ottoman Empire, a protector of Islam, against its enemies Britain, France, Russia, Serbia and Montenegro: ...read more

The Evolution of the Hard Hat

Today protective headgear is ubiquitous in American industry. This dates from 1919, when recently discharged 1st Lt. E.W. Bullard devised the first “Hard Boiled Hat”, patterned after the Doughboy’s M1917 ‘Brodie’ pattern helmets. Bullard’s hats were somewhat different from the WW1 helmets but, as the photograph above shows, many others were virtually identical.  You can read all about this by clicking here. ...read more

The Bullitt Mission

In March of 1919, President Wilson’s top advisor ‘Col.’ Edward House authorized William C. Bullitt (1891 – 1967), who was a minor U.S. diplomat attached to the American delegation to the Paris Peace Conference, to lead an eclectic committee to make a clandestine visit to Russia. Their charge was to attempt to negotiate a treaty between the U.S. and the Bolshevik government, end Allied intervention in the Russian Civil War, lift the Allied blockade of that country, and allow the Allies to withdraw their troops from Russia. Bullitt received a proposal from the Bolshevik government that would have realized all these goals (and more, if the Bolsheviks could be trusted to repay war debt), but the Allied leaders at the Paris Peace Conference were unwilling to accept the offer. The British, in particular, were not inclined to strike any deals with Communists. ...read more

« Older posts

© 2021 Kansas WW1

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑